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RC01-262 Internal Medicine Card Catalog


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RC78 - Examination, Diagnosis Including radiography

RC81 - Second Opinions

RC261 - Hypercalcemia

RC262 - Fatigue, Pain, Psychosocial Issues, Sexuality, Spirituality, Support Groups, Survivorship Issues

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Examination, Diagnosis Including radiography
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RC78.7.A210.1 More Helpful Ideas for MRI Scans
Shawna Anderson, Doreen Jaskela, Nancy Moffatt, Judith Nielsen, Sherry Pedersen, Pat Ratclif
I had an MRI while I still had a port and surgical staples, no problem. Yes, prepare yourself with a sedative, and DON'T OPEN YOUR EYES!
http://www.cancerlynx.com/moremri.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC78.7.C99.1 - Helpful Ideas for MRI Scans
Jim Carlson, Celeste Daly, Ronald Ginnetty, Teresa Hendricks, Marie Meier, Karolen Paularena, Angela M. Sissions
What worked for me was taking the technician's advice and using the washcloth she gave me to put over my eyes
http://www.cancerlynx.com/mri.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC78.7.N464.1 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Risks
Laura Nathanson, MD, FAAP
MRI safety guidlines are optional. MRI accidents usually go unreported unless the machine itself has attacked the victim. Flying buckets and pistols go unreported, including the disabled pacemaker or the displaced dental prosthesis. MRI suites, even new ones, may be designed without protections against accidents.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/mririsk.html
Link added 2007-07-07
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RC81 - Second Opinions
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RC82.R68.1 - Cancer Second Opinions
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Malin Dollinger, MD, Richard and Annette Bloch
None of us are prepared to be told we have cancer. It's like a membership in a new club, one we didn't know existed, didn't apply for, and don't want to belong to. Everyone seems to treat us differently. All of our old priorities and life suddenly change.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/second_opinions.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


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RC261 - Hypercalcemia
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RC261.S354.1 - Elevated blood calcium level-Hypercalcemia
Julie Schwenka, PharmD, UCSF
Hypercalcemia (high levels of calcium in your blood) is the most common life threatening disorder that is associated with cancer. It occurs in 10 to 20% of cancer patients.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hypercalcemia.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


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RC262 - Fatigue, Pain, Psychosocial Issues, Sexuality, Spirituality, Support Groups, Survivorship Issues
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RC262.A5.1 - The Leap of Faith into the Darkness
Alexandra Andrews, Karen Bailey, Allan Grossman, Martha Hale, Wendy Sheridan
There are no road maps for our cancer treatment. There are no studies, no trials, just leaps of faith into the darkness.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/leap.html
Link added 2006-06-30; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.A5.2 - Cancer List Guidelines and Tips
Alexandra Andrews and Wendy Sheridan
A cancer diagnosis creates a critical crossroad in life. The knowledge that you are not alone can help relieve some of the fear and anxiety the diagnosis can bring. E-mail lists are a wonderful way to make contact with others on a similar journey, to exchange information, provide support and much more.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/list.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.A118.1 - Treating Metastatic Disease
Kathleen Allen, RN
The realistic goal in treating metastatic disease is to beat it back for as long as you can.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/metstreat.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.A152.1 - Pain Management
Melanie Aguillard
My pain management story .. This will be a charged issue and I am sure you will get a lot of different advice. My whole spine is involved and pain is what led to my diagnosis
http://www.cancerlynx.com/painmanage.html
Link added 2006-05-21; update 2007-07-07


RC262.B123.1 - Body Image and Cancer
Kyla Brooke, LMFT, CMT
Your body, along with your body image, can be powerful resources for your healing process. Body image is how you perceive your body and your physical appearance. This is a changing event; a snapshot in time. It is your own mental picture of yourself.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/bodyimage.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.B404.1 - Sexuality, Intimacy And Communication
Jean Bullard, RN, MS; David G. Bullard, PhD; Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Sexuality can sometimes be affected by a serious illness, such as cancer, and by its treatment. By sexuality we mean the feelings we have about ourselves as sexual beings, the ways in which we choose to express these feelings with ourselves and others, and the physical capability each of us has to give and experience sexual pleasure.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/sexuality.html
Link added 2006-05-21;
RC262.B435.1 - I Don't Have Time Not to Live
Carol Buck
There is a great connection between the mind and the body...I don't have time not to live. I live a very busy life, both in life and in enjoyment.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/time.html
Link added 2007-07-07;


RC262.C262.1 - Cancer Supportive Care Survivorship Issues
CancerSupportiveCare.com Team
Cancer is a life-changing event! Cancer survivors need to be made aware of the new conditions and risks that follow cancer and its treatment. Cancer Survivors need a comprehensive follow up program to enhance quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/index.html
First appeared 2007-04-28; updated 2007-07-07


RC262.E432.1 - Expedition Inspiration
Laura Evans
I feel as if I have been given a special gift - the gift of life - and I don't want to squander it.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/expedition.html
Link added 2007-07-07


RC262.F377.1 - Cancer Support Ideas and Programs
Pat Fobair, LCSW, MPH, Marty Marder and Sheila Slattery
Many topics come up in support groups: like the impact of the diagnosis, one's sense of loss or grief, overwhelming emotional reactions, physical losses, communication problems, and the reactions of others
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/supportideas.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


RC262.G294.2 - Coping Strategies ~ Name That Cancer
Velvet Girling
Everything I did would be based on cancer, no overnight miracle here. I need to live with my cancer - alert to any new signs or symptoms but not be ruled by it.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/cancername.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.G230.1 - Redefining Failure: A Nurse's View
Teresa T. Goodell, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Many cancer patients have heard the failure word, and many use it to describe their treatment history, as if it were a fact of their illness, as if it were a test.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/failure.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.G288.1-To Call Forth That Spark
Kathleen Grant, MD
Hope is part of that empowerment that says, I have a right to wish for more life, more health, more time to accomplish a goal.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/spark.html
Link added 2007-07-07
RC262.G288.2 -To Call Forth That Spark
Kathleen Grant, MD

Hope is part of that empowerment that says, I have a right to wish for more life, more health, more time to accomplish a goal http://www.cancerlynx.com/spark.html
Link added 2007-07-07


RC262.I433.1 - Each Day Really Is a Miracle
Father Isaacs
The will to live, is awakened by looking through a new set of eyes at what you have been doing and getting a new perspective on your life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/miracle.html
Link added 2007-07-07


RC262.K9.1 - Overcoming Depression
Andrew W. Kneier PhD
A significant percentage of cancer patients have episodes of depression. When this happens, your entire experience with cancer is more difficult; your resilience is weakened, and overall adjustment can be hampered. Depression can also undermine your will to live and compromise the courage, fortitude, and determination that you need to face cancer and to endure the necessary medical treatments.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/depression.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.K9.2 - Emotional Support
Andrew W. Kneier PhD
The term emotional support is commonly used when talking about the needs of cancer patients. However, this concept means different things to different people.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/emotional.html
Link added 2006-11-01; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.K9.3 - Cancer Coping Strategies
Andrew Kneier, PhD, Diane Behar, Isadora Rosenbaum, MA and Ernest Rosenbaum, MD
Coping refers to the attitudes and behaviors that you use to maintain your emotional well-being and to adjust to the stresses caused by cancer. Different people cope in different ways, and some ways of coping are more successful in promoting well being
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/cope.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.K9.4 - Spirituality and Chaplaincy
Andrew Kneier, PhD, Jeffrey Silberman, DMin, Andrew Freinkel, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, David Spiegel, MD
A life-threatening disease, such as cancer, confronts us with realities and questions that prompts to step back from our lives and reflect on the meaning and implications of the illness.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/spirituality.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


RC262.L127.1 - Dying Guide Line for Care Givers
Lee Law
Here is a guide line, for those who are dying and what we as care givers and supporters need be aware
http://www.cancerlynx.com/dying.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.L127.2 - Things to Do For Metastatic Cancer Patients
Lee Law and Carol Law
This list is intended as a help guideline of things that may be done to help improve the quality of care for the cancer patient. It is also a guide line for what to prepare for in the advent of death.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/metsguide.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


RC262.M250.1 - Dying Bald
The Masked Patient
Some prefer to die as themselves, not as Cancer Patient 573607, and a bald head DEFINITELY gets in the way of their normal self-image. And its's easy to focus on the dismay of being bald and dying, rather than the fear and sadness of dying.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/bald.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07


RC262.P117.1 - Let-down After Test Results
Karolen I. Paularena
About feeling depressed about good news. I think this is very common, based on what I've read here and what I've felt and what I've been told by others with cancer.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/let-down.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.P117.2 - The Median Isn't the Message
Karolen I. Paularena
But YOU will either respond to the therapy, or YOU will not. YOU will live, or YOU will die.
http://www.cancerlynx.com/median.html
Link added 2006-05-21;
RC262.P324.1 - Diversions - Creativity And Coping
Cynthia Perlis, BA; Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD; Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Courage, hope, faith, sympathy, love promote health and prolong life. A contented mind, a cheerful spirit is health to the body and strength to the soul. How you live has a major effect on your health and your life
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/diversions.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07

RC262.R68.1 - Fatigue Reduction and Management For The Primary Side-Effects Of Cancer Therapy
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD; Barbara F. Piper, RN, OCN, DNSc; Marilyn Dodd RN, PhD; Kathleen Dzubur, MS; Michael Glover, Pat Kramer, RN, MSN, AOCN; RoseAnn Kurshner, RN, BSN, MEd; Francine Manuel, RPT
Fatigue may be compounded by the exhaustion brought on by the very drugs and radiation treatments meant to cure cancer, including anemia, emotional stress, physical weakness, muscle deconditioning and fears
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/fatigue.html
Link added 2006-05-21;
RC262.R68.2 - Fatigue Diagram
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Diagram showing supportive tips for fatigue
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/fatigue_diagram.html
Link added 2006-05-21;
RC262.R68.3 - Cancer is a life-changing event!
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LMSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Cancer survivors need to be made aware of the new conditions and risks that follow cancer and its treatment, and strategies they can implement to reduce their vulnerabilities. Physicians need access to the most current standards in care and clinical guidelines.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/survive.html
Link added 2006-06-29; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.4 - Post Cancer Survivorship Measures
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LMSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
The challenges cancer survivors face can best be overcome with a team approach. Their medical team, family, friends, community resources, and themselves.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/follow.html
Link added 2006-06-29; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.5 - Late and Long-term Effects of Cancer and Its Therapy
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LMSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Current five-year cancer survival rate is over 64%, knowledge of the possible latent side-effects of cancer therapy can arm survivors with knowledge and a plan.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/late.html
Link added 2006-06-30; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.6 - Healthy Lifestyles
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LMSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Survivors need to improve physical, emotional quality of life and promote better health and reduce the risk of premature morbidity and mortality.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/lifestyle.html
Link added 2006-07-02
RC262.R68.7 - Inner Fire: Your Will to Live - Stories of Courage, Hope, and Determination
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
The will to live is in both your heart and your mind. Common factors for the will to live - hope, faith, attitude, determination, the love of life, courage, luck and chance, the ability to cope, a support system, having a purpose, and appropriate medical care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/index.html
Link added 2006-11-25; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.8 - Inner Fire: Your Will to Live - Introduction
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, and David Spiegel, MD
Inner Fire factors include: hope, faith, attitude, determination, the love of life, courage, luck, chance, the ability to cope, a support system, having goals, and appropriate medical care
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/begin.html
Link added 2006-11-25; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.9 - Introduction To Climb A Mountain
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
Expedition Inspiration to conquer Aconcagua in Argentina, the highest mountain outside the Himalayas inspired hope and courage in women with breast cancer...Count me in. I've got a lot more to live for and a lot more to give in this life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/climb.html
Link added 2006-11-25; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.10 - An Assessment of Sexual Desire and Arousal Disorders in Women
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Sex and desire are the need for emotional closeness. How to evaluate and strategize ways to improve sexual dysfunction. Guidelines have been set up for assessment and management of sexual dysfunction in women, which advocate attention to mental and overall health, interpersonal and personal psychology issues. They recommended local estrogen therapy for dyspareunia associated with vaginal atrophy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/sex.html
Link added 2007-07-07;
RC262.R68.11 - Enhancing Cancer Survivorship Care Through a Comprehensive Program
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD,
Cancer Survivors need a comprehensive follow up program to enhance quality of life. Early and late side effects include cardiac and pulmonary toxicities. There is development of heart, lung and kidney protective drug programs to reduce organ impairment from drug and radiation therapy. Medical supportive care may be needed including oxygen at home, medications, as well as possible hospice care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/care.html
Link added 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.12 - Introduction - Unfinished Business
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA
We live because we want to live. But the incentive must one which we inwardly, utterly believe. It is not the everything to live for in the eyes of the world that keeps us alive, but the something which meets our own uncompromising measure of what is worth living for.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/intro2.html
Link added 2007-07-07
RC262.R68.13 - Cancer Survivorship
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD,
Once you have had cancer, your life is never the same. Even for those, who are cured, the psychological and physical trauma of the cancer experience leaves short and long-term lasting effects, both on the personality and approach to life, creating an appreciation for living in many.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/survivor.html
Link added 2007-07-07;
RC262.R68.14 - Cancer Facts and Aging
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD,
Barriers and Outcomes in the Management of Cancer Survivors and Deconditioning: A Major Problem with Cancer Patients also includes information on the treatment of the elderly
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/aging.html
Link added 2007-07-07
RC262.R401.1 - Pain Control
Wendy Robbins, MD; Robert W. Allen, MD
Pain can have a terrible effect..It can lead to depression, loss of appetite, irritability, and withdrawal from social interaction, anger, loss of sleep and an inability to cope. If uncontrolled, pain can destroy relationships with loved ones and the will to live. Fortunately, pain can almost always be controlled.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pain.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07

RC262.S327.1 - Cancer Psychosocial Support
David Spiegel, MD; Pat Fobair, LCSW; Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA; Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Cancer inevitably stirs strong feelings: fear, anger, sadness, among others.There is no evidence that expressing sadness or fear allows cancer to progress. Indeed, if anything the opposite is the case.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/live.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07

RC262.S327.2 - Courage and Hope
David Spiegel, MD
Respond creatively to a life-threatening illness hear it as a wake-up call, a reminder of how time is short and life is precious.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/courage.html
Link added 2006-05-21; updated 2007-07-07
RC262.S434.1 - Arms Too Short to Box with God
Val Staton
The will to live is the desire to continue on... A person who has the comfort of faith and the ability to accept and continue on is much better off than somebody who is only materially wealthy.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/InnerFire/box.html
Link added 2007-07-07

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First appeared July 7, 2007