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RC262.C29
Cancer Survivorship, Life After Cancer Issues

RC262.C29.D500.1 - Life After - A Roadmap for Cancer Survivors Index
Sarita Dubey, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, FACP, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPH, Thierry Jahan, MD, David Jablons, MD, Sheila Breslin, RN, MS, OCN, Debra Thalert-Demers, RN, OCN, PRN-C, Sandra Horning, MD, Bernard Gordon, MD, David Claman, MD, Mitchell Rosen, MD, John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, D. Kathryn Tierney, RN, PhD, Alexandra Andrews, Ranjana Advani, MD, Christine M. Derzko, MD, Gary F. Milechman, MD, FACC, Jay S. Luxenberg, MD, Robert J. Rushakoff, MD, FACP, Felix O. Kolb, MD, Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, Jack LaLanne, Holly Gautier, RN, Paul Asfour, Wendye Robbins, MD, Richard Shapiro, MD, Francine Manuel, RPT, David G. Bullard, PhD, David Spiegel, MD, With Louise Maffitt, BFA
Cancer is a life-changing event! Survivors must face the realities and potential consequences of a cancer diagnosis. The goals of the Cancer Survivorship Programs are to provide knowledge and education and guidance to survivors, families and friends through programs that promote healthy nutrition, exercise, and supportive and preventive care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/index.html
Link added 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.D500.2 - A Roadmap for Cancer Survivors
Sarita Dubey, MD, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, FACP, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPH, Thierry Jahan, MD, David Jablons, MD, Sheila Breslin, RN, MS, OCN, Debra Thalert-Demers, RN, OCN, PRN-C, Sandra Horning, MD, Bernard Gordon, MD, David Claman, MD, Mitchell Rosen, MD, John P. Cooke, MD, PhD, Andrzej Szuba, MD, PhD, D. Kathryn Tierney, RN, PhD, Alexandra Andrews, Ranjana Advani, MD, Christine M. Derzko, MD, Gary F. Milechman, MD, FACC, Jay S. Luxenberg, MD, Robert J. Rushakoff, MD, FACP, Felix O. Kolb, MD, Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, Jack LaLanne, Holly Gautier, RN, Paul Asfour, Wendye Robbins, MD, Richard Shapiro, MD, Francine Manuel, RPT, David G. Bullard, PhD, David Spiegel, MD, With Louise Maffitt, BFA
Cancer survivors begin a new lifelong battle, which is best fought through a team approach. People are living longer following diagnosis, detection and improved treatments. Follow-up care is essential to promote long-term survival.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/roadmap.html
Link added 2008-09-21;
RC262.C29.H501.1 - Symptomatic Problems in Cancer Survivors
Sandra Horning, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Cancer survivors - breast, testicular, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's, lymphoma, have developed long-term cardiopulmonary toxicity due to cancer therapies. Cardiopulmonary evaluation by a cardiologist or pulmonary specialist is mandatory when symptoms - shortness of breath, chest heaviness or pain, rapid heart beat, fatigue, tiredness, low-grade fever, swelling of the legs, (from heart failure or possibly blood clots which could lead to pulmonary emboli).
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/symptom.html
Link added 2011-03-28;
RC262.C29.R68.1 - Cancer is a life-changing event!
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Cancer survivors need to be made aware of the new conditions and risks that follow cancer and its treatment, and strategies they can implement to reduce their vulnerabilities. Physicians need access to the most current standards in care and clinical guidelines.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/survive.html
Link added 2007-07-07; reviewed 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.R68.2 - Post Cancer Survivorship Measures
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
The challenges cancer survivors face can best be overcome with a team approach. Their medical team, family, friends, community resources, and themselves.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/follow.html
Link added 2006-06-29; reviewed 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.R68.3 - Late and Long-term Effects of Cancer and Its Therapy
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Current five-year cancer survival rate is over 64%, knowledge of the possible latent side-effects of cancer therapy can arm survivors with knowledge and a plan.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/late.html
Link added 2006-06-30; reviewed 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.R68.4 - Healthy Lifestyles
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Patricia Fobair, LCSW, MPh, and David Spiegel, MD
Survivors need to improve physical, emotional quality of life and promote better health and reduce the risk of premature morbidity and mortality.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/lifestyle.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.5 - Survivorship
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD,
Once you have had cancer, your life is never the same. Even for those, who are cured, the psychological and physical trauma of the cancer experience leaves short and long-term lasting effects, both on the personality and approach to life, creating an appreciation for living in many.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/survivor.html
Link added 2007-07-07; reviewed 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.R68.6 - Enhancing Cancer Survivorship Care Through a Comprehensive Program
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD,
Cancer Survivors need a comprehensive follow up program to enhance quality of life. Early and late side effects include cardiac and pulmonary toxicities. There is development of heart, lung and kidney protective drug programs to reduce organ impairment from drug and radiation therapy. Medical supportive care may be needed including oxygen at home, medications, as well as possible hospice care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/care.html
Link added 2007-07-07; reviewed 2008-09-20
RC262.C29.R68.7 - Cancer Survivorship Care Models
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Adult and pediatric survivorship care is vital. Cancer patients have lifetime health problems such as heart (cardiac) and lung disease, lymphedema, body image, depression, weight gain, obesity, diabetes, secondary, recurrent cancers, cognitive function, premature menopause, infertility, sexual dysfunction, fatigue, osteoporosis, and other lifestyle changes. Nurse practitioners are often the leaders in survivorship clinic follow-up and long term programs.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/model.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.8 - Cancer Survivorship Quality of Life
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Define quality of life using these four domains - Physical well-being, control of symptoms maintaining both function and independence, Psychological well-being emotional distress, maintaining as positive a life as possible, Social well-being, dealing with the impact of cancer and Spiritual well-being,maintaining hope, deriving meaning and having a philosophy of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/surviveqol.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.9 - The Cancer Survivorship Care Plan Summary
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
An organized preventive medicine program is needed with screening and advice on ways to adopt healthier lifestyles for diet, exercise, emotional support, and treatment of comorbidities. The possibility of late side effects from therapy or recurrent cancer makes medical surveillance necessary for ten to twenty-plus years by the oncologist, primary care medical team and survivor. These are the crucial elements in the shared care approach of the Survivorship Care Plan.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/share.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.10 - An Example of a Survivor's Follow-up Plan (Text version)
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
An example of a Survivor's Follow-up plan please remember - There is no one specific follow-up guideline schedule, as each cancer and patient are different and will require an individualized follow-up program in part depending on the type of cancer and stage, its risks, and its aggressiveness.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/survivorplan.txt
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.11 - An Example of a Survivor's Follow-up Plan (PDF version)
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
An example of a Survivor's Follow-up plan but remember There is no one specific follow-up guideline schedule, as each cancer and patient are different and will require an individualized follow-up program in part depending on the type of cancer and stage, its risks, and its aggressiveness.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/survivorplan.pdf
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.13 - Cancer Survivorship Care Program
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, FACP, David Spiegel, MD, Sandra Horning, MD
A comprehensive proactive approach to improve quality of life, prolong survival, control co-morbid health problems, prevent complications or late side-effects from cancer and its therapy, help discover a recurrence or a new cancer early. By following post-therapy diagnostic schedules with screening, detection and diagnosis by physicians, the medical team and specialty consultants can improve cancer care with earlier treatments.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/survivorship.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.14 - Lifestyle Changes to Improve Longevity and Quality of Life
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Improve survivorship, use information on cancer prevention, supportive care programs, healthy lifestyles and ways to reduce comorbidity. Avoid weight gain. Reduce fats, and increase fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods. Exercise, limit alcohol, no tobacco, avoid excess sun, adopt osteoporosis prevention.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/change.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.15 - Emotional Spiritual and Religious Support
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD and David Spiegel, MD
At times of extreme vulnerability, we all tend to pay more attention to our innate spirituality and seek to restore a feeling of being connected with the universe or a spiritual idea beyond ourselves. Survivors often feel that their spirituality has been deepened through their experience with cancer. One aspect of quality of life concerns a sense of peace or acceptance.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/spirit.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.16 - Lifestyle and Age
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
The relationship between lifestyles and survival following cancer therapy is important. As people age, there are other concurrent comorbid diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, obesity, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis - cholesterol hardening of the arteries, and type 2 diabetes.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/lifeage.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.R68.17 - Cancer Toxic Side Effects
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Patients who have received radiation or cardiopulmonary toxic chemotherapy drugs merit long-term follow-up. Tests include EKG, echocardiogram, chest x-ray, CAT scans, ischemic heart disease, mortality and toxicity. Control of diabetes, alcohol, hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, exercise and diet can reduce morbidity and mortality.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/toxicity.html
Link added 2011-03-28;
RC262.C29.R68.18 - Comorbidity and Cancer
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Comorbid diseases are chronic illnesses existing with another medical condition. The number and severity affect clinical care, treatment options, health service needs, and prognosis. Preventing cancer and successfully treating comorbidities are vital for survivors.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/comorbidity.html
Link added 2011-03-28;
RC262.C29.S327.1 - Coming to Grips - Life After Cancer
David Spiegel, MD, Patricia Fobair LCSW, MPH, and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Survivors often liken their cancer experience and their efforts to resume a normal life to that of returning war veterans. A physical cure does not mark the end of the healing process. Strategies can be devised to ease the difficult transition from a state of illness to one of well-being.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/grip.html
Link added 2008-09-21;
RC262.C29.S327.2 - Surviving the Emotional Impact of Cancer
David Spiegel, MD, Patricia Fobair LCSW, MPH, and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Cancer patients and survivors experience emotional and social wellbeing challenges during cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. Common problems following treatment are - Fatigue, Anxiety, and Emotional Distress, Depression, Body image, Sexual problems, Mind and memory losses. How survivors have coped both in the past and in the present, for life and death problems help them deal with the consequences of their illness, resolving to make the best of a sometimes difficult situation.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/emotion.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.C262.1 - Appendix Cancer Survivorship Care Program
Cancer Supportive Care
Useful Audio, Guidelines, Web and Internet resources and Publications, Includes information on staging, diagnosis, family issues, end of life, and childhood cancer, and supportive care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/appendix.html
Link added 2008-09-20;
RC262.C29.C262.2 - Conclusion Life After Cancer - A Roadmap for Cancer Survivors
Cancer Supportive Care
Survivors of cancer graduate to a new life keenly aware of how fragile life is and are ready to fight to preserve it. Realities and potential consequences related to cancer and therapy can best be addressed with a team approach, medical, family, friends, community resources, and, most importantly, yourself.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/graduate.html
Link added 2008-09-20;


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First appeared May 21, 2006; updated June 5, 2011